Daikoku Discovers: Concentrate Vapes

The high quality concentrates that are available in Alberta deserve to be consumed using quality pieces. But if you’re new to dabbing, getting started can seem daunting. Which is why a concentrate vape is a nifty accessory if you want to avoid purchasing a lot of gear. Today we’re inspecting two of the industry’s top rated dab pens to help you determine which one to add to your cannabis wishlist. On today’s inspection spotlight we have the SLASH dab pen from Stonesmith and the Carta V2 by Focus V. 

The Products

The Slash can withstand Canadian winters

The Slash:

The SLASH dab pen is a concentrate vape from Stonesmith. It is proudly manufactured here in Canada. Stonesmith prides themselves in developing thoughtful designs with the cannabis community in mind. With its ergonomic design and forward-thinking features, the SLASH takes dabbing to an elevated level. 

Carta: The portable dab rig.

The Carta V2

Proving that dab rigs can be portable, the Carta V2 by Focus V is changing the cannabis vapourizer game. Offering both concentrate and dry herb consumption (using the additional dry herb atomizer), the Carta is designed to meet every stoners’ needs. 

How to use your device:

Slash:

Load concentrates easily and mess-free using the built-in loading tool. Press the button 3 times to cycle settings (temperature).

Hint: Press twice to  activate the automatic 12 second setting.

In our experience, this yields the best output.

Carta:

The large bowl offers a stronger experience for more frequent consumers. Press the button 5 times to turn on, and 5 times or one long press to turn off. 

Temperature Control 

Slash:

Three temperature levels: high, medium, low. 12 second auto-mode. Press the button to cycle through temperature settings. 

Carta:

To heat up, press the button once and your base will heat to the last temperature set. To change the temperature, single clicks allow you to change from 500°F up to 842°F. Quartz or titanium atomizer.

Cleaning 

Both devices

1-step cleaning process. After use, clean the inside of the ceramic bowl using a q-tip and 99% isopropyl alcohol. Avoid touching the any silicon parts with the alcohol!

It’s a lot easier to clean the device after every use than after a number of uses!

Your device will thank you for regular cleaning.

Appearance

Slash:

Compact, brass pen design is sleek and lightweight. Offering a high-end look and feel that will have you showing this off at every event. 

Carta:

Emulating the iconic dab rig shape with an added futuristic aesthetic. A 100% borosilicate glass water piece caps off the Carta’s base, providing an ultra-smooth experience. 

What’s the best concentrate vape?

It depends what you’re using it for.  If you’re looking for an easy-to-use, on-the-go vape that not only gets the job done but looks good while doing it then the SLASH is for you. Alternatively, if you’re interested in a new and improved take to the classic dabbing experience then the Carta is your match. 

When it comes to finding your perfect accessory we’re always here to help. There’s many factors to keep in mind and our staff have the knowledge to help you make the right decision. Let us know if you have any questions about the SLASH, Carta, or any other cannabis vapes. 

Shatter: It’s the Sheet

Shattter : It's the Sheet

We now have a number of Shatter options in Alberta. Fireside has brought three different cultivars of the product to the market. Stigma Grow is poised to bring their latest Banana Punch x Sour Grape concentrate to market any day now:

It’s coming… #StigmaGrow #shatter #bananapunch #sourgrape

Posted by Stigma Grow on Saturday, August 8, 2020

About Shatter

Shatter is a bit of the new kid on the block. It came to market in Canada in the nineties alongside badder. Both formats were the culmination of the research for a pure form of concentrates, with no fats or residues.

It’s typically thin and glass-like. It reminds me of sugar candy, which is unsurprising because I liken everything to food.

Sheet of Shatter by Stigma Grow
Sheet of shatter by Stigma Grow. 🤤

How is shatter different from other concentrates?

When you break it apart – or, more heartbreakingly, drop it – shatter shatters. It’s where it gets its name from. It’s as satisfying as cracking a crême brulée topping. 

This concentrate can reach a potency of up to 90% THC. (Read: this product is better suited for experienced consumers, not someone starting their cannabis journey.) Ultimately, “Shatter” is the nickname for this format of hash oil.

What’s Hash oil? 

Licensed Producers obtain hash oil, also known as butane hash oil or BHO, using a solvent-based extraction method. Licensed producers will either use a Hydrocarbon-based (eg, butane) extraction process, or a CO2-based extraction process.

Wait. Butane. You mean there’s lighter fuel in my shatter?

Well, yes. But no.

Butane has a boiling point of -0.5˚C and burns cleanly (leaving little to no residue) during the natural process of creating hash oil. If left to professionals, that is.

Solvent extraction is a dangerous process.
Licensed Producers are closely monitored to ensure overall safety and legal compliance.

This includes ensuring that there are no residues on the products we buy.

Consuming Shatter

These types of concentrates are best consumed when using a concentrate vaporizer or a dab rig. Use tweezers to manipulate the solid product. Place in a dab rig attachment to your bong. Heat the product until it produces vapour, either with an e-nail, or using a torch lighter (like the one you’d use for the aforementioned crême brûlée, not one you pick up for a buck or two) and a carb cap.

You can also add it to a joint – think of it like croutons to a salad. Add the chunks of shatter towards the end tip: burning the concentrate too early can clog up your joint.

Anatomy of a Dab Rig

Learn more

About Fireside

About Stigma Grow

Still Time Concentrate!

High Level Overview of Concentrates in Alberta, Part 2 of 2

Weed looks a lot different these days. Concentrates have hit Albertan Retailer’s shelves. On the market, we hear words like shatter, caviarbadder, rosin and resin. We walk down memory lane when people mention hash.

In Part Two of this two-part series, we take a look at the different products that are considered concentrates on the legal Canadian Cannabis market. Please note that at time of publishing, not all these products are available.

Chemical or Mechanical

Concentrates are created by taking a large amount of cannabis and extracting the desired cannabinoids, either through chemical solvents or mechanical processes.  Higher quality cannabis providers only use cannabis flower to create their products.

Chemically derived concentrates

Highly concentrated cannabis extract dissolved in petroleum-based or alcohol-based solvent (for example, butane and ethanol). THC potency in these products can be as high as 90%. 

Badder/Budder:

  • Looks like: Crunchy peanut butter
  • Consumed by: Using a dab rig or a concentrates vaporizer
  • Manipulate with: A dabber
Badder is also called budder

Caviar

  • Looks like: Caviar (surprisedpikachu.jpg)
  • Consumed by: Using a dab rig or a concentrates vaporizer
  • Manipulate with: A dabber
The diamonds in the caviar are THC concentrates

Wax

  • Looks like: Toffee/Soft caramels or hair pomade
  • Consumed by: Using a dab rig, sprinkling on a joint, capping off a bowl
  • Manipulate with: Your hands or a dabber, depending on consistency
Malleable

Shatter

  • Looks like: A broken lollipop
  • Consumed by: Using a dab rig or a concentrates vaporizer
  • Manipulate with: A dabber or tweezers

Note: Shatter can melt. Store in refrigerator or freezer

Shatter is a BHO derived concentrate

Hash oil

  • Looks like: Olive oil if it’s liquid, or a thin, orange-tinted sheet if it’s solid
  • Consumed by: Vaporizer pens, cartridges or, if solid, dab rigs
  • Manipulate with: A vape battery, a dabber or tweezers

Note: Hash oil, sometimes called Butane Hash Oil (BHO) or Propane Hash Oil (PHO)  is not for oral ingestion

Hash oil is also sometimes called honey oil or cannabis oil

Rick Simpson Oil (RSO)/Phoenix Tears:

  • Looks like: Molasses
  • Consumed by: Ingestion
  • Manipulate with: A syringe

Resin:

  • Looks like: Rock candy coated in maple syrup
  • Consumed by: Using a dab rig, concentrate vaporizer
  • Manipulate with: Dabber

Mechanically derived concentrates

Loose trichomes or pressed resin from cannabis flower or hash. THC potency in these products can be as high as 60%. Products in this category include kief, hash and rosin.

Kief/Keef

  • Looks like: Thin, dusty powder
  • Consumed by: Sprinkling onto a bowl or joint that already has dry cannabis flower
  • Manipulate with: A kief spoon
DIY kief by using a multi-tiered grinder

Hash/Hashish

  • Looks like: Small, crumbly brownie or caramel chew
  • Consumed by: Sprinkling onto a bowl or joint that already has dry cannabis flower; ingestion
  • Manipulate with: Your hands
Forbidden snack. I mean, you could eat it, but... don't.

Bubble hash:

  • Looks like: Small, crumbly overbaked cookie
  • Consumed by: Using a dab rig (the hash will ‘bubble’ as you heat it up)
  • Manipulate with: Your hands

Rosin:

  • Looks like: Amber-coloured blown glass
  • Consumed by: Using a dab rig, concentrate vaporizer
  • Manipulate with: Dabber, clean hands

Wondering about concentrate basics? Then check out Part 1, where we discuss at how concentrates are different from oils, why people talk about live and cured concentrates, and what distillate is.

PS: When I was proofreading the blog post before posting it, I realized that a LOT of my “looks like” entries were about… food. So it made me think of this fun sketch (the link opens a YouTube video). I figure you deserve a treat if you’ve read the whole post. 😉

Time to Concentrate!

So many ways to consume cannabis!

High Level Overview of Concentrates in Alberta, Part 1 of 2

Weed looks a lot different these days. Concentrates have hit Albertan Retailer’s shelves. On the market, we hear words like shatter, caviar, badder, rosin and resin. We walk down memory lane when people mention hash.

In Part One of this two-part series, we look at how concentrates are different from oils, why people talk about live and cured concentrates, and what distillate is.

Oils and Concentrates

Cannabis licensed producers (LPs for short) collect plant biomass (in other words, anything that’s green: stems, leaves and all!). They activate the THC within the product, through a process called decarboxylation. LPs combine the activated biomass with a carrier oil, infusing said oil with cannabinoids. You can use oils to make edibles. On the Canadian market, we find MCT oil derived from coconut oil or palm kernel oil, as well as sunflower oil as carrier oils.

Oils are cannabis-infused; concentrates contain only cannabis.

Why this matters: You absorb medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) more easily than household oils, which are typically long-chain triglycerides. This helps the effects kick in faster.

Concentrates, on the other hand, are more like a cannabis reduction. Think “maple syrup”. LPs reduce tons of cannabis until an oily product is left.

The type of concentrate you get depends on the exact process you used to obtain your end product.

Live and Cured

Licensed producers use never-dried cannabis product to make live products. The plant material is either used immediately after harvest or cryogenically frozen to preserve it.

Why this matters: Fresh and flash-frozen cannabis contains the most terpenes, yielding a more flavourful experience.

Live Resin Badder are awesome concentrates

On the other hand, licensed producers can also use plant material that has been cured or dried to make… cured cannabis products! (Sometimes, the naming conventions are creative; other times, we have 7 products called Sativa on our menu — it makes no sense to me either.)

Distillate

Distillate isn’t just a cannabis reduction. You obtain distillate by distilling cannabis biomass down to until you obtain a specific cannabinoid — typically THC and CBD. CO2 is currently the main method of distillate extraction on the market.

Distillate applications include:

RedeCan's Vape products are made with Distillate
Vaporizers and cartridges
TGOD's THC Infuser
Food and beverage infusers
Premixed beverages and teas
LivRelief Transdermal Cream
Topicals

Distillate allows licensed producers to control with precision the levels of cannabinoids within for a product, ensuring consistent THC potency. LPs will sometimes add terpenes back in. If LPs use terpenes derived from cannabis plants, we deem this product to be “full spectrum.”

Some concentrates are full spectrum distillate products

Why this matters: There is some debate as to whether adding back in plant- or botanical-derived terpenes contribute to effects, or if they are only used for flavour.

Tomorrow, we’ll take a look at the different products that are considered concentrates on the legal Canadian market in Part 2.