Acknowledgements

On May 24th 2018, we signed our lease on the premises that would become Daikoku.

Today, almost a full year later, we’ve officially (re-)opened – we’d been selling accessories since January 2nd – and have started selling cannabis. It’s a lot of emotions to process, but the one that I feel the most is gratitude.

Continue reading “Acknowledgements”

How to manage impairment at work

How to manage impairment at work

The legalization of cannabis caused many business owners some pause: what can you do, as an employer, if your employees take cannabis?

While the situation has been brought to the forefront due to cannabis legalization, it’s important to remember that impairment extends to alcohol and even prescription medication. The government of Canada defines an impaired individual within a workplace context as “someone who may have difficulty completing tasks in a safe manner and may put themselves, their coworkers and the public in danger.”

What are the employer’s responsibilities

There are currently no provisions in the Labour Code that cover how to manage impairment. However, employers must implement a Hazard Prevention Program which can include policies with regards to the use of cannabis or impairment inducing substances.

Their main responsibility is to ensure the health and safety of all employees and the public.

Is drug testing allowed?

There is no blanket regulation with regards to drug testing, though it may be permissible in specific instances. In general, however, drug testing is deemed as being discriminatory. See What are the rules for drug testing in Canada? for more information.

What are alternatives to drug testing?

Monitoring, through frequent conversations, observation and supervision, is the recommended course of action.

What about medical marijuana?

Like any other prescription medication, an employer has to accommodate employees who use medicinal marijuana. Of course, this is contingent on employees having all the legal and medical documentation to possess and use cannabis for medical purposes.

In all cases, employees are expected to be able to perform their job safely and to complete their tasks successfully, regardless of the medication they take.

The information contained herein is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice on any subject matter or as encouragement to consume cannabis. For more information, please visit:

Icons made by Kiranshastry from www.flaticon.com; licensed by CC 3.0 BY

What to watch: Super Mario Brothers (1993)

Pokemon: Detective Pikachu will be coming out in May 2019. To get into the mood of “Video game movie adaptations that should never have seen the light of day*,” this week’s movie recommendation is the quintessential Super Mario Bros.

(No news yet on the new Super Mario Bros. movie that Nintendo announced in February of last year, in partnership with Illumination.)

Synopsis

Set in dark and dreary Dinohattan, our favourite plumber brothers set out to save a kingdom. There is little jumping, oddly shaped Goombas and… wait, is that YOSHI?!

For Extra Fun

If you like the idea of a dystopian Mario Brothers world, check out “There will be brawl” – a YouTube based mini-series by Machinima.

Links

* May 2019: I would like to apologize: Detective Pikachu does not fit in the category of “Video game movie adaptations that should never have seen the light of day.” It delivers on its promise and does a great job of recreating the Pokéverse.

It’s hard to recommend a good movie. But everyone can laugh at a terrible movie. Which is why “The best worst movies” series focuses on movies that have become iconic for all the wrong reasons. In collaboration with Drunken Cinema and movie-expert Alyssia, we’ll be presenting movies to keep you entertained. Of sorts.

Daiko-who?

Cannabis Boutique

Daikoku stands out from other cannabis retailers in a very obvious way: the store name makes no reference, implied or oblique, to cannabis.

Instead, it’s a foreign word. Oftentimes, when people get it right, there’s laughter and even a mini celebration (it’s pronounced: da•i•ko•ku – we’ll teach you when you come to the store).

Continue reading “Daiko-who?”

Keep it in Canada: Do’s and Don’ts of Travelling with Cannabis

Iconography by freepik.com

Can I bring my own cannabis into Canada?

While medical and recreational cannabis is legal in Canada, it is illegal to cross the border in possession of cannabis. This is a blanket prohibition: it applies regardless of where you’re from or how much you have in your possession. And yes, this includes medical cannabis even with proof of prescription.

Can I leave Canada with some cannabis as a souvenir?

It is illegal to cross the border in possession of cannabis. Yes, this applies when you’re leaving the country as well, even if marijuana is legal at your destination. You might even be denied entry into countries that prohibit consumption of cannabis.

Some countries, such as Japan and South Korea, have issued statements whereby nationals visiting Canada who consume cannabis could face the same consequences as if they had consumed it at home.

Can I bring cannabis with me when travelling within Canada?

You can travel with legally purchased cannabis within Canada.

That being said, you need to follow local laws with regards to possession and consumption. For example, in Alberta, you must be 18 to purchase cannabis. Most other provinces and territories have set the minimum age to 19. Meanwhile, Québec is gearing up to make the legal age for cannabis purchase and consumption 21.

Sources: