Quality, Potency and Price: A Primer to Pick your Pot

A customer had a bad experience at Daikoku today. I’m still reeling from the interaction myself. It was due mostly to the fact we were talking two different languages: they equate potency to quality, whereas I see them as two distinct elements.

In light of this conversation, I thought I would go over the various comments I hear and read about the legal cannabis market in Canada:

“It’s way too dry.”

“The quality is terrible.”

“It’s too expensive.”

Continue reading “Quality, Potency and Price: A Primer to Pick your Pot”

Acknowledgements

On May 24th 2018, we signed our lease on the premises that would become Daikoku.

Today, almost a full year later, we’ve officially (re-)opened – we’d been selling accessories since January 2nd – and have started selling cannabis. It’s a lot of emotions to process, but the one that I feel the most is gratitude.

Continue reading “Acknowledgements”

What are terpenes?

The nose knows

“The nose knows” – so goes the saying. While “terpenes” (the compound that gives cannabis its smell) are fairly “new” when people talk about cannabis, enthusiasts have known for a long time that if you find a smell you like, odds are you’re going to enjoy the effects. Obviously, this isn’t foolproof. Enter the science of terpenes.

Continue reading “What are terpenes?”

What are THC and CBD?

What are THC & CBD?

Some of the compounds found in cannabis have such long, science-y names, yet are so pervasive in cannabis culture that their abbreviations roll off the tongues of cannabis connoisseurs of all stripes. To the uninitiated, however, it just sounds like a whole lot of alphabet soup.

Here’s a quick description of the two most well-known cannabinoids: delta-9-tetrahydrocannabidol (THC) and cannabidol (CBD).

Continue reading “What are THC and CBD?”

How to manage impairment at work

How to manage impairment at work

The legalization of cannabis caused many business owners some pause: what can you do, as an employer, if your employees take cannabis?

While the situation has been brought to the forefront due to cannabis legalization, it’s important to remember that impairment extends to alcohol and even prescription medication. The government of Canada defines an impaired individual within a workplace context as “someone who may have difficulty completing tasks in a safe manner and may put themselves, their coworkers and the public in danger.”

What are the employer’s responsibilities

There are currently no provisions in the Labour Code that cover how to manage impairment. However, employers must implement a Hazard Prevention Program which can include policies with regards to the use of cannabis or impairment inducing substances.

Their main responsibility is to ensure the health and safety of all employees and the public.

Is drug testing allowed?

There is no blanket regulation with regards to drug testing, though it may be permissible in specific instances. In general, however, drug testing is deemed as being discriminatory. See What are the rules for drug testing in Canada? for more information.

What are alternatives to drug testing?

Monitoring, through frequent conversations, observation and supervision, is the recommended course of action.

What about medical marijuana?

Like any other prescription medication, an employer has to accommodate employees who use medicinal marijuana. Of course, this is contingent on employees having all the legal and medical documentation to possess and use cannabis for medical purposes.

In all cases, employees are expected to be able to perform their job safely and to complete their tasks successfully, regardless of the medication they take.

The information contained herein is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice on any subject matter or as encouragement to consume cannabis. For more information, please visit:

Icons made by Kiranshastry from www.flaticon.com; licensed by CC 3.0 BY